The Collector’s Edition | Caring for Your Private Art Collection

Filling your home with art is both a way of expressing yourself and curating the mood and atmosphere of your space. Think of your home as your own gallery, a blank slate with endless possibilities to surround yourself with artwork that inspires. Perhaps you consider your art collection in a methodical way, procuring only a few pieces to fill white walls in need of a focal point; or maybe you’re an art lover, eager to diversify your collection with oil paintings and sculptures alike. No matter your goals or methods, collecting and displaying art in your home is a personal endeavor, but there are a few things to keep in mind once you have an established collection.

Hire an Art Consultant

Sonia GherardiONE Sotheby’s International Realty

Part of the challenge of sourcing art is determining which pieces will work in your home, and how to obtain them. Hiring an art advisor or consultant—like Sotheby’s firm Art Agency, Partners—is an important step in ensuring that your collection is a thoughtful representation of your tastes. Curators that are linked to art institutions are not ethically permitted to be paid to advise private collectors on specific purchases, though they will sometimes be willing to direct you to catalogs, exhibitions, or galleries to help you make an informed decision; art advisors or consultants, on the other hand, are able to give you advice about which specific pieces to buy—and they have access to more off-market opportunities.

In addition to helping you determine and develop your taste, an art advisor generally has a strong network of galleries and collectors, which means they’ll be able to give you better access to opportunities ahead of the general public. Avoid overpaying for a work with an advisor’s guidance, who will be willing to bid for you at auctions and to arrange the logistics of transportation and installation. With their insider information and expertise, an adviser will be able to help you build a collection through both gallery purchases and public auctions.

Netherlands Sotheby’s International Realty

With a large art collection, it’s likely that not every piece will be displayed in your home at all times. Whether you choose to store additional pieces in your own home, in a specialized art storage facility, or in a private museum will depend on how vast and prestigious your collection is. Creating your own art storage will require determining where in your home is a suitable environment—avoid spaces with air vents or windows, which can damage art by exposing it to sunlight or air, causing fading or mold. Insurance is essential for any collector.

If you choose instead to store your collection with a specialized fine art storage facility, you will have the option of having a private space or a shared one. These facilities are outfitted with archival-quality conditions, like climate control, to ensure your artwork’s preservation. Sotheby’s Greenford Park, for example, is the fine art storage facility for Sotheby’s London, and features a viewing gallery and photographic studios. Some collectors are compelled to establish private foundations or museums to house their overflow of artwork, choosing to share their collection with the public. Aiming for the best of both worlds, the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen of Rotterdam has plans to open a public art depot as a special extension of the gallery, which will house collectors’ work that can be viewed by the public on an appointment-only basis.

Maintain Your Collection’s Integrity with a Conservator

Midge Carolan Berkery & David ColemanMott & Chace Sotheby’s International Realty

The moment you make an art purchase, whether you’re a first-time buyer or a veteran collector, you need to consider how you’re going to care for and preserve it. If a piece has been poorly stored in the past, leading to damage, or if you’ve acquired a piece through auction that has been unearthed from a forgotten basement, chances are the artwork is going to need some TLC. A conservator is trained to record the damage that has occurred and to reverse the damage, a valuable resource for any art collector. Often, the fees for a conservator’s work will be covered by your insurance policy, and the fee is dependent on the type of work that needs to be performed, not on the value of the artwork itself.

Experienced collectors know that hiring a conservator prior to a major purchase is a wise move, both to protect their investment and to ensure that the installation of the piece goes smoothly. Artwork can be extraordinarily fragile and easily damaged in transport.

Make Use of Freeports for Collection Rotation

Steve SallionWarren Lewis Sotheby’s International Realty

Whether you’re planning to rotate out the pieces currently on display in your home, or if your private museum or foundation is under construction and you need a temporary home for the pieces being displaced, utilizing a freeport is a smart option. Freeports—warehouses located near seaports and airports that facilitate international trade—allow the import and storage of valuable goods, providing secure long- or short-term housing for artwork. Pricing of freeport storage depends on geographic location as well as size—a freeport in Manhattan will cost more than one in Portland. With extremely secure storage options and a temporary exemption from tax payments, the freeport is useful to the collector looking for a reliable way to discreetly rotate valuable fine art.

Art can transform a home, turning it into a sanctuary of creative energy. However you choose to curate your collection, be sure to protect your investment with smart storage and considered professional care.

Find the perfect blank slate for your burgeoning collection with these works of architectural art.

 

 

 

Design Trends | How Texture Transforms Home Décor

Can’t decide what’s missing from your latest design project? Chances are, it’s texture. The texture is an all-important—and sometimes overlooked—element in transforming a space from flat to multidimensional, adding layers of depth and richness. Be it via countertops or flooring, creating the right atmosphere is all about choosing the right surfaces. Below, we feature nine trending surface textures and where to use them.

Concrete

texture design

Yolanda TejedaChile Sotheby’s International Realty

Industrial charm doesn’t have to be reserved for the factory-turned-loft space. Concrete is a low-maintenance (and economical) way to pour on some industrial chic when it comes to your space. Flooring is a particularly savvy use of the material, as concrete tends to require minimal upkeep, and any dings, dents, and chips will only add character.

Quartz

interior design

Monty RobertsDamianos Sotheby’s International Realty

Quartz is quickly gaining popularity as a low-maintenance alternative to sought-after surfaces like marble or soapstone. As a non-porous and stain-resistant material, quartz is ideal for kitchen countertops that see lots of entertaining. Comprised of parts of natural minerals bonded together with resin, it’s also one of the more environmentally sound options on the market, taking a greater-than-the-sum-of-its-parts approach to delivering a beautiful end product.

Marble

marble bathroom

Peter IllovskyCôte d’Azur Sotheby’s International Realty

With extraordinary, one-of-a-kind natural veining, marble in any space creates a striking, elegant effect. While the exterior of this surface is undoubtedly strong and beautiful, it’s important to keep in mind that marble has a soft side. A porous material, it’s possible for marble surfaces to be stained from acidic liquids (white wine, lemon), meaning a degree of maintenance is required. For those who love the look without the worry, consider using the material for bathroom countertops and flooring where acidic liquids are less likely to be used.

Parquet

beauty bedroom

Dali ShovalAustria Sotheby’s International Realty

The 1950s and 60s were a heyday for parquet flooring, but the origins of this mosaic method of arranging wooden planks in a geometric pattern dates back to the 16th century. Nowadays, parquet flooring is synonymous with elegant European interiors and Haussmann-era Parisian buildings. The more traditional parquet floors are usually arranged in chevron and herringbone patterns, cut in a range of different types of wood from oak to walnut. Despite its luxe look, parquet often surprises with its manageable options for installation and moderate price point.

Carpet

design inspiration

Poland Sotheby’s International Realty

Carpets are an easy way to add a layer of warmth to your home, particularly in the bedroom where it can be comforting to wake up to something soft underfoot. Unlike their predecessors, the best modern carpets are stain, dirt, and water-resistant, thanks to new advancements in manufacturing. When selecting the right carpet for your space, be sure to take traffic into account: plush, high-pile textures tend to work better in lower-traffic areas, while close-cut piles are hardier and easier to keep clean.

Wood Paneling

wood paneling

Nina Siegenthaler & Joe ZahmTurks & Caicos Sotheby’s International Realty

When it comes to textures in the home, why should walls be neglected? Wood paneling may have gotten a poor reputation during the mid-century era, when it covered everything from basements to bathroom walls; today, it’s the purposeful approach that makes a statement. Go all out with floor-to-ceiling paneling and tons of natural light to create a warm, modern effect, or play with thinner wooden planks in smaller proportions for geometric visual interest.

Slate

slate

Faisal HalumBriggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty

It’s important to consider strength, crack-resistance, and temperature-retaining properties when selecting natural stone as flooring. One of the strongest natural stone options available, slate is an ideal choice underfoot as it is durable enough to go decades without needing to be replaced, providing proper maintenance is given. While this natural beauty is great at transmitting heat and cold, it is not so good at retaining it, making it ideal for homes in warmer climates or with radiant floor heating.

Moroccan Tile

morrocan tile

Joan EleazerBriggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty

Whether for backsplash or flooring, tiles are a fashionable way to elevate and add luxury to a space. Some of the most well-crafted options emanate from Morocco, where the art of zellige—a process of fabrication using individual geometric pieces—is still employed today. These pops of pattern are surfacing in homes as a vibrant alternative to neutral tiles and floors.

Ledgestone

Ledgestone

Bea JarzynskaSotheby’s International Realty Canada

For a rustic environment full of cozy charm, consider using ledgestone. This technique of stacking stone to showcase its edge as opposed to its face creates loads of rough texture, establishing a gritty focal point that works particularly well for a statement wall, backsplash, or fireplace treatment. The variating tones and raw edging of ledgestone adds stacks of visual interest to even the most minimalist modern of spaces.

When it comes to great design, it’s all about what’s on the surface. From glossy countertops to cozy fireplaces, inspired surroundings start with the right textures.

 

 

 

Video: Sprawling Equestrian Estate in Lower Saxony, Germany

Lower Saxony, Germany | Alexander StehleHamburg, Sotheby’s International Realty

Links to the region are apparent in the details of the estate, including reed-thatched roof and the use of historic brickwork fired in the style of previous centuries. Trimmed with green and caressed by plant life, this secluded property is a private sanctuary.

red brick house

After crossing an emerald lawn adorned with granite stepping stones, swing open stately doors into the estate’s generous entry space. Highlighted by FarEast art, this is the start of a remarkable journey.

Luxury pool

Enjoy peacefulness across this luxurious property, from the turquoise pool to the tasteful interiors. Every detail speaks to the home’s calming atmosphere, away from the chaos of life’s hustle and bustle.

german homes for sale


Discover the difference in a real estate network spanning around the globe. Contact us today to begin your Sotheby’s International Realty journey.

Penthouse Profile | Florida’s Most Design-Forward Condos

Some design aficionados may claim that nothing beats the Art Deco buildings on Miami Beach, but push farther afield and you’re guaranteed to find architectural gems in new builds and traditional high rises alike. The Sunshine State is making waves with a crop of water view condos featuring stunning penthouse suites. Dig into gleaming, streamlined kitchens, refreshing bathrooms with an oceanic feel, classic American comfort in plush living rooms, and long-table dining. Add in endless views of beach and ocean and bright splashes of color, and you may find that the state’s endless summer suits you just fine.

The Private Island Penthouse in Aventura

ONE Sothebys International Realty

Rosemarie FriedmanONE Sotheby’s International Realty

For anyone who’s ever dreamed of running away to their own private island, there’s Privé. The only property on the island, this development blends resort luxuries with urban conveniences—think private elevators, 70,000 square feet of indoor social spaces, and a private marina for yachts up to 150 feet, all done up in top-of-the-line finishings with nods to mid-century and inspired minimalist style. From the impeccable chef’s kitchen to the generous patio space to the at-home spa, the clean lines, beautiful stone, and inviting woods of this five-star penthouse to harmonize perfectly with the water below.

The Hotel High Rise Penthouse at Miami Beach

Florida homes for sale

Brenda Powers & Gabriela DajerONE Sotheby’s International Realty

Sitting pretty atop the W Hotel, this vista-rich penthouse hits high notes of contemporary and eclectic décor. Designed by Steven G, the home features 12-foot ceilings, which add an airy ambiance to the hints of Moroccan styling in the condo’s lighting, rugs, and chairs. Slatted woods, Calcutta marble, and chevron ceiling inlays add a nice nod to the natural world clearly visible via unobstructed 180-degree views from this peak Florida find.

The Airy Penthouse Over the Green in Boca Raton

penthouse

Monica SquierNestler Poletto Sotheby’s International Realty

Consider this chic slice of heaven a picture-perfect blank slate for decorating to your heart’s content. Dress the light-filled rooms in fashion-forward throws, artistic portraits, and high-gloss accents, grounded by elegant black window grilles and kitchen counters. Or play up the escape factor with plush patio furniture on the Mediterranean-style terrace overlooking the fairway below. Paired with 10-foot ceilings and porcelain flooring, the penthouse’s amenities include a private two-car garage, designer kitchen with bar, and custom walk-in closets, all within an easy walking distance of some of the best entertainment Boca Raton has to offer.

The Glass Gulf Penthouse in Destin

beach living

Jonathan SpearsScenic Sotheby’s International Realty

Crystal clear glass spans both floors of this luminous Destin penthouse. A notch above open-concept, the two-story atrium-style living room is overlooked by bedrooms with glass feature walls so that not an inch of the Gulf of Mexico view is wasted. From the sun deck to the chef’s kitchen to the rooftop pool to the floating staircase, reflectivity runs throughout, each quality surface gleaming. Thoughtful design ensures possessions are tucked away, fostering a calming, hotel-style feel throughout.

The Bright and Beachy Penthouse at Sunny Isles Beach

Florida coast

Fabian Garcia Diaz & Allan KleerONE Sotheby’s International Realty

Everything about this two-story penthouse at Sunny Isles Beach feels optimistic. The décor hits a sweet spot, combining playfulness, excitement, and a relaxed tone that can only be found near sandy shores. Sparkling light fixtures and reflective surfaces play well off textured stone walls and marbled floors. A wave mosaic in the bathroom hints at the opportunities for water recreation just a few floors down. Plush chairs and a statement chandelier nestle around a matchstick-leg table open for brunch anytime.

The Traditional Surrealist Penthouse, Sunny Isles Beach

beauty

Oxana ObolevitchONE Sotheby’s International Realty

From the patterned ceiling designs to the quirky light fixtures to the organic-shaped mirrors, there is something unusual and appealing about this Collins Avenue penthouse. The stately living room with its glossy surfaces and crisp whites harkens to fine yacht interiors, while the home’s washrooms feature custom Bisazza mosaics and in-shower saunas. Dock your boat below at one of the berths available for sale or rent, host guests on the penthouse’s wraparound patio, and relax into the Sunny Isles lifestyle.

Whether sleek and minimalist or alive with splashes of color and unique treasures, these design-forward condos in Florida have the market on sunshine and ocean views cornered.

Your own home in the sky awaits; find your ideal Florida penthouse and enjoy the luxury and convenience of top-of-the-world living.

Alysia Reiner’s 4 Favorite Things at Home

Walk through actress Alysia Reiner’s home and you’ll know that each and every curated item is loved.

Alysia Reiner

The 1909-era brownstone Alysia Reiner shares with her husband, actor David Alan Basche, and daughter, Livia, 9, was once a neglected shell of a building. But in 2006, the couple took a chance on the space, rebuilt it, and returned it to its original dignity.

Reiner—who is filming season three of Better Things, season six of Orange Is the New Black, and stars in and produced the movie Egg, which had its premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival this spring—walked us through the home, sharing her favorite things in it.

Robert Rauschenberg Painting

Robert Rauschenberg Painting

“I’m so not a ‘stuff ’ person,” says Reiner. “But David kept asking what I would like, and I said, ‘OK, someday I’d like to own a Rauschenberg’ since he’s my favorite artist. So, for our anniversary this year, he blew my mind.”

Homemade Vodka

Homemade Vodka

“I steep peppers, ginger, or lemons in vodka. The pepper vodka can get very spicy, which I love, depending on the pepper you use and how long you steep it. I love making a jalapeño infusion or a pepper martini.”

Necklace Tree

Necklace Tree

“Liv and David made this for me for Mother’s Day, and it truly is my favorite thing. Liv knows how to use a circular saw and did half of the cutting of the spalted maple base, a piece of which was in our cellar.”

Buddha

Buddha

“A dear friend has a store called The Monkey & The Rat, and I said, ‘Would you please find us a beautiful blessed Buddha with a story behind it?’ Our friend found this Begging Bowl Buddha in Tibet.”

Photography by Deidre Schoo

 

Modern Color That Never Goes Out of Style

Color is powerful. It can be commanding, soothing, or energizing; therapeutic and mood-altering; and perhaps beyond all else, it can make (and leave) a solid impression. With such influence at your fingertips, deciding on a color palette for your home can feel daunting—deciphering the nuances, knowing when to go bold—but these tried-and-true shades never go out of style.

Black and White

Nantucket realty

Nantucket, Massachusetts | Craig Hawkins & Bernadette MeyerMaury People Sotheby’s International Realty

Has there ever been a more classic color combination? Checkered floors will always be a kitchen favorite, but the fresh way to use this combo is to lean further into white and employ black in the elegant contrasting details, as seen at this beautifully designed Nantucket home. The pairing offsets the more casual aspects of the home, including an outdoor pool and family game room.

Taupe and Coffee

homes for sale in california

Montecito, California | Suzanne PerkinsSotheby’s International Realty – Montecito – Coast Village Road Brokerage

Typically, Balinese-style beach houses in tropical destinations are outfitted with bright accents to offset the wealth of wood running throughout, but this Montecito stunner breaks the mold with shades of taupe and coffee. The mostly monochrome walls and furniture take a refined and relaxed backseat so the setting—particularly the sunset views from the infinity pool—can really shine.

Gray Escape

gray escape

Southampton, New York | Harald Grant & Bruce GrantSotheby’s International Realty – Southampton Brokerage

From a cloud-like softness to steely strength, gray has substantial versatility, especially when it comes to modernizing traditional estate designs. Upstate at a Southampton summer-house, an airy main living space is accented in slate and smoky metals, adding depth to an otherwise creamy palette. Punch up neutral rooms with this moody hue and bask in the calming power of a good gray.

Soothing Blues

interior design

New York, New York | Randall Gianopulos & Christian EmanuelSotheby’s International Realty – East Side Manhattan Brokerage

Dusty blue curtains, porcelain objets d’art, and a beautiful coat of blue paint all pair perfectly with antique, historical furniture, crafts-style woodworking, and a heavy dose of patterned fabrics. Blue’s tranquil feel has the ability to anchor beloved treasures, as seen at this Upper East Side mansion in New York.

Yellow and Gold

black and yellow

San Francisco, California | Bernadette LamotheSotheby’s International Realty – San Francisco Brokerage

There is a particular richness to yellow tones, be they featured on textured mustard walls, sunshine-bright seating, or rippled gold frames. Not only does this sunny shade complement almost any kind of lighting design masterfully, but it instantly illuminates vintage chandeliers and antiques. Pass it from chair to patterned wall to French door to feel as though you’ve stepped into Versailles, as executed at this palatial Pacific Heights apartment in San Francisco.

While there is much to be said for passing trends, as long as you stick to a classic color palette, your home will always stay in fashion.

Find palettes that spark your imagination in these designer listings, and bring timeless color into your life.

A Sunday in Milan

Italy’s second largest city is no slouch. Centuries of history, art, and culture underscore its reputation as a high fashion destination, design hub, and foodie paradise. Milan is also the nation’s financial and economic capital, drawing in business and design powerhouses from around the world. Whatever the reason you come to Milan, you’re sure to find yourself in close proximity of something to revere.

Morning

Milan

Milan, Italy | Barbara FregonaraItaly Sotheby’s International Realty

Start your sacred Sunday in the fashion district among the haute couture boutiques in an on-trend contemporary penthouse. Take in the views of the Duomo from your lower private terrace or 360-degree views of the city from a second terrace upstairs before pouring over your options in the walk-in closet. Alternatively, you can rise nearby, in an exclusive two-story penthouse with concierge service, complete with 180-degree views of Viale Luigi Majno and sweeping city vistas.

Italy

Pasticceria Marchesi in Milan, photo courtesy of Pasticceria Marchesi

Wherever you start, it is sure to be close to a spot for “colazione all’italiana” (Italian breakfast), which consists mainly of three major coffee food groups: espresso, cappuccino, or latte macchiato. Pair your pick with an Italian cornetto—usually more petite and sweeter than the French croissant, and often filled with jam, cream, or chocolate spread. If you want to wander to a true breakfast institution, venture over to Via Montenapoleone and visit the 19th-century-built Cova or Marchesi cafés.

Golden Square in Milan

Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, photo courtesy of pcruciatti / Shutterstock Inc.

Hopping on a tram and getting lost in the city is a favourite Milanese pastime, so beyond the beautiful Duomo di Milano, you’ll find some hidden and entertaining treasures in the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, a glass arcade shopping center first designed in 1861, or the romantic Orto Botanico di Brera gardens in the art-laden district of Brera, where pathways of greenery and lush flora may convince you that you’ve suddenly stepped into the countryside.

Milan, Italy realty

Giardino Botanico of Brera, photo courtesy of pcruciatti/ Shutterstock Inc.

Even if you didn’t wake up next to it (possibly because you’re in Milan’s modern Porta Nuova district, where impressive new skyscrapers are changing the skyline of the city), the Giardini Pubblici Indro Montanelli is Milan’s oldest and most impressive park. Since 1784, the gardens have been repeatedly enlarged and enriched with educational attractions, including the Natural History Museum and Planetarium.

Afternoon
italy

Japanese sushi restaurant in Tortona, photo courtesy of Paolo Bona/ Shutterstock Inc.

Head to the young and dynamic district of Tortona for lunch, where new and innovative restaurants serving Indian and Japanese dishes are mixing it up amongst the old Milanese osteria. A plate of traditional “cotoletta” (pan-fried veal) is sure to satisfy.

After your bite, you must shop. After all, Milan is an epicenter of global style. In Brera, Tortona and Naviglio, small boutiques with emerging luxury designers offer shoppers something fresh, while in the Via Montenapoleone fashion district, you can find the most famous labels within steps of each other.

Evening

evenings in milan

Iyo restaurant in Milan, photo courtesy of Iyo

To visitors, Milan may be a pizza and pasta heaven, but to real foodies, it is a Michelin-star capital. Try Cracco in Galleria, Iyo, or Il Luogo di Aimo e Nadia to start. More casual but equally delightful fare can be found at luxury Indian spot Cittamani, hipster hangout Dabass, or Potafiori, where you can eat amidst bold arrangements of the seasons latest blooms.

Post-dinner cocktails and aperitivos can be found along the Corso Garibaldi, which doubles as a fantastic pedestrian street, should you wish to walk off your meal. Or head back to Brera, where Bar Jamaica has hosted Italian artists and poets since 1911, including Gianni Dova, Roberto Crippa, and Erenesto Treccani.

“Milan is full of hidden treasures, from the Giardino Botanico in Brera to the old Milanese streets close to Corso Magenta,” agree Milan real estate experts Ilaria Pinto and Nerina Masini from Italy Sotheby’s International Realty.“You should hop on a tram and get lost in the city”.

Wherever you plan to shop, see, and eat the day away, your Sunday in Milan is sure to be full of serendipitous turns and surprises and wrapped in the city’s rich history.

 

The First Permitted 3D-Printed Home Unveiled

Last month the first ever permitted 3D printed home in America was unveiled at South by Southwest (SXSW) in Austin, Texas. The project was the inception of the Sotheby’s International Realty® brand’s charitable partner New Story and their construction technology partner, ICON.

The 3D printer is expected to accomplish the following goals:

  1. Significantly decrease the cost of building a home in the developing world. Currently, it costs $6,500 for New Story to build a home. The printer will significantly cut the cost to $4,000 a home with potential for it to continue to become more affordable.
  2. Make home construction faster. Homes can be built in 12-24 hours with the printer.
  3. Improve the quality of the final home.

3D Printer

A defining factor of this new technology is that it will be used first in the developing world, in El Salvador, for people who are currently living without shelter, a basic human need. The printer can fit on a truck so it’s easily transportable, it’s durable and it uses a mortar that can be found anywhere.

“We made the decision to partner with New Story in 2017 because we agree that the home is the epicenter of your life. New Story’s desire for continued innovation to drive change is remarkable,” says Lindsey Scharf, Director PR & Communications Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC.“The launch of the 3D printer will make a huge impact in their mission to provide homes for families in the developing world and we are proud to be aligned with them in this venture.”3D printed house

“We are incredibly proud to help advance New Story’s mission to transform people’s lives by providing the foundation of life, a home,” says John Passerini, Global VP Interactive Marketing, Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. “Their innovative approach to not only building homes but entire communities has already made an incredible difference for so many people and with their introduction of a 3D printer, they will be able to streamline the process like nobody has ever done before.”

charity house

The 3D printer received significant media coverage including Architectural DigestFast CompanyWiredThe VergePBS and BuzzFeed to name a few.

Take a closer look at the 3D printer in action

Learn more about New Story

The Making of March Madness

The Madness is upon us; beginning tonight you can catch the first games of the March Madness season. Whether you’re sold out for collegiate basketball or just a bandwagon fan, we’ve put together a brief history on one of the most competitive times in sports. While some in our office are a little bias (Go Wolverines AND Spartans!), tell us which team you’re rooting for in the comments!

A Humble Beginning

March 27, 1939 – The NCAA hosts its first college basketball championship featuring only eight teams. This small bracket continues for the first 12 years of the tournament. At the inaugural game, the University of Oregon defeats The Ohio State University 46-33. Schools like Indiana, Wisconsin, Stanford, and Wyoming go on to win the tourney in the next few years’ of competition.

Growing Interest

1951 – The NCAA’s basketball tournament gains more and more national attention, now hosting 16 teams. In 1982, CBS broadcaster Brent Musburger helps coin Henry Porter’s signature phrase ‘March Madness’ during game coverage.

A New Ball Game

1985 – The now modern format of a 64-team tournament shakes up college basketball. In 2001, the tournament shifts into four regions of 16 teams. The winning teams from these regions now meet in the host city for the Final Four, developing this once humble tournament into a sell-out.

So while you’re watching the big games this year, realize you are taking part in quite a seasoned history – one that will continue to shape athletes for years to come. With that being said… let’s watch some basketball!


Looking to buy or sell this March Madness season? Let us help you score big on your next real estate transaction! 

Sotheby’s | Inside the Wine Collections of Great Connoisseurs

Drawing from some of the best cellars known to Sotheby’s, the collections featured in Finest & Rarest Wines (24 February, New York) include wines from the most sought-after domains in Burgundy, the top chateaux in Bordeaux and beyond. Selections such as La Tâche DRC 1995, Heitz Cellar Martha’s Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon 1991 and Petrus 1993 highlight the unparalleled study and passion of true wine connoisseurs. Read on to learn more about the remarkable private collections, along with their greatest treasures, in the upcoming sale.

Sothebys

Lot 38. La Tâche Drc 1985 (2 Bottles). Estimate $6,500–9,500Lot 41. Romanée Conti Drc 1985 (2 Bottles). Estimate $17,000–26,000. Lot 36. La Tâche Drc 1990 (3 Bottles). Estimate $9,000–12,000.

Legends from the Cellar of a Long-Time Oenophile

This fabulous selection from a West Coast Collector and aficionado, whose passion for wine was born during a trip to France many years ago, begins with over thirty bottles and fifteen lots from iconic DRC. Highlights include two bottles of 1985 Grands Echezeaux, four vintages of Richebourg and two bottles of the mythical 1985 Romanée Conti. In addition, rarely does one ever see an astonishing eight vintages of La Tâche, including multiple bottles from the legendary 1985, 1990, 1993 and 1996 vintages. An impressive selection of Bordeaux follows with all of the First Growths present including full cases of 1990 Lafite and Margaux, 2000 Haut Brion, Mouton Rothschild and Latour amongst many others. Finally, not to be overshadowed are individual bottles of the immortal 1929 Y’quem.

Almost all of these wines were bought on release and stored meticulously by the original owner in a private, purpose-built temperature controlled cellar. The wines, part of a much larger collection, were inspected on site and shipped to Sotheby’s warehouse via temperature-controlled truck.

Sotheby's wine

Lot 331. Vega Sicilia Unico 1970 (10 Bottles). Estimate $5,500–8,000Lot 330. Vega Sicilia Unico 1979 (3 Bottles). Estimate $900–1,200. Lot 328. Vega Sicilia Unico 1987 (2 Bottles). Estimate $500–700. Lot 327. Vega Sicilia Unico 1989 (3 Bottles). Estimate $750–1,100.

Pristine Bordeaux, Burgundy and Champagne from a Manhattan Collector

From the moment this gentleman, a long-time Sotheby’s client in New York City, began amassing a cellar, provenance and pristine conditions have been the hallmark of the collection. The vast majority of this collection was purchased on release, with the balance sourced from the most reputable of retailers and auction houses. These impeccably sourced wines were removed from temperature-controlled professional storage and purpose-built home cellars for transfer to Sotheby’s warehouse.

We begin in Bordeaux, with a focus on the outstanding 2000 and 2005 vintages. Cos d’Estournel, Grand Puy Lacoste, Léoville Las Cases and Lynch Bages all appear in original wood, alongside a full case of Mouton Rothschild 1998. Continuing on to Burgundy, twelve bottles each of La Tâche 1998 and 1995 are followed by a truly impressive parade of large formats: La Romanée Liger-Belair 2003 in jeroboam, and magnums of Clos de la Roche Dujac 1993, Musigny J.-F. Mugnier 1999 and Bonnes Mares G. Roumier 2005. An incredibly rare full dozen bottles of Musigny Joseph Drouhin 1996 in original carton, plus Krug Clos d’Ambonnay 1996 and Pol Roger Cuvée Winston Churchill 1988 in jeroboam, rounds out this spectacular offering of blue chip rarities.

Lot 249. Heitz Cellar Martha’s Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon 1991 (6 Magnums). Estimate $2,200–3,200Lot 248. Heitz Cellar Martha’s Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon 1991 (12 Bottles). Estimate $1,800–2,600.