The Collector’s Edition | Caring for Your Private Art Collection

luxury homes for sale

Filling your home with art is both a way of expressing yourself and curating the mood and atmosphere of your space. Think of your home as your own gallery, a blank slate with endless possibilities to surround yourself with artwork that inspires. Perhaps you consider your art collection in a methodical way, procuring only a few pieces to fill white walls in need of a focal point; or maybe you’re an art lover, eager to diversify your collection with oil paintings and sculptures alike. No matter your goals or methods, collecting and displaying art in your home is a personal endeavor, but there are a few things to keep in mind once you have an established collection.

Hire an Art Consultant

Sonia GherardiONE Sotheby’s International Realty

Part of the challenge of sourcing art is determining which pieces will work in your home, and how to obtain them. Hiring an art advisor or consultant—like Sotheby’s firm Art Agency, Partners—is an important step in ensuring that your collection is a thoughtful representation of your tastes. Curators that are linked to art institutions are not ethically permitted to be paid to advise private collectors on specific purchases, though they will sometimes be willing to direct you to catalogs, exhibitions, or galleries to help you make an informed decision; art advisors or consultants, on the other hand, are able to give you advice about which specific pieces to buy—and they have access to more off-market opportunities.

In addition to helping you determine and develop your taste, an art advisor generally has a strong network of galleries and collectors, which means they’ll be able to give you better access to opportunities ahead of the general public. Avoid overpaying for a work with an advisor’s guidance, who will be willing to bid for you at auctions and to arrange the logistics of transportation and installation. With their insider information and expertise, an adviser will be able to help you build a collection through both gallery purchases and public auctions.

Netherlands Sotheby’s International Realty

With a large art collection, it’s likely that not every piece will be displayed in your home at all times. Whether you choose to store additional pieces in your own home, in a specialized art storage facility, or in a private museum will depend on how vast and prestigious your collection is. Creating your own art storage will require determining where in your home is a suitable environment—avoid spaces with air vents or windows, which can damage art by exposing it to sunlight or air, causing fading or mold. Insurance is essential for any collector.

If you choose instead to store your collection with a specialized fine art storage facility, you will have the option of having a private space or a shared one. These facilities are outfitted with archival-quality conditions, like climate control, to ensure your artwork’s preservation. Sotheby’s Greenford Park, for example, is the fine art storage facility for Sotheby’s London, and features a viewing gallery and photographic studios. Some collectors are compelled to establish private foundations or museums to house their overflow of artwork, choosing to share their collection with the public. Aiming for the best of both worlds, the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen of Rotterdam has plans to open a public art depot as a special extension of the gallery, which will house collectors’ work that can be viewed by the public on an appointment-only basis.

Maintain Your Collection’s Integrity with a Conservator

Midge Carolan Berkery & David ColemanMott & Chace Sotheby’s International Realty

The moment you make an art purchase, whether you’re a first-time buyer or a veteran collector, you need to consider how you’re going to care for and preserve it. If a piece has been poorly stored in the past, leading to damage, or if you’ve acquired a piece through auction that has been unearthed from a forgotten basement, chances are the artwork is going to need some TLC. A conservator is trained to record the damage that has occurred and to reverse the damage, a valuable resource for any art collector. Often, the fees for a conservator’s work will be covered by your insurance policy, and the fee is dependent on the type of work that needs to be performed, not on the value of the artwork itself.

Experienced collectors know that hiring a conservator prior to a major purchase is a wise move, both to protect their investment and to ensure that the installation of the piece goes smoothly. Artwork can be extraordinarily fragile and easily damaged in transport.

Make Use of Freeports for Collection Rotation

Steve SallionWarren Lewis Sotheby’s International Realty

Whether you’re planning to rotate out the pieces currently on display in your home, or if your private museum or foundation is under construction and you need a temporary home for the pieces being displaced, utilizing a freeport is a smart option. Freeports—warehouses located near seaports and airports that facilitate international trade—allow the import and storage of valuable goods, providing secure long- or short-term housing for artwork. Pricing of freeport storage depends on geographic location as well as size—a freeport in Manhattan will cost more than one in Portland. With extremely secure storage options and a temporary exemption from tax payments, the freeport is useful to the collector looking for a reliable way to discreetly rotate valuable fine art.

Art can transform a home, turning it into a sanctuary of creative energy. However you choose to curate your collection, be sure to protect your investment with smart storage and considered professional care.

Find the perfect blank slate for your burgeoning collection with these works of architectural art.

 

 

 

2019 Pantone Color of the Year | Living Coral

Pantone

Pantone®, the global authority on all things color, has named a new Color of the Year for 2019: PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral. On the surface, its lively effervescence evokes both lighthearted playfulness and bold self-expression. But it’s worth diving a little deeper to really appreciate this rich, thought-provoking shade.

Because what is living coral? It’s a community of tiny organisms who work together to build unique, bustling underwater cities. The vivid tones of the coral reef is a visual representation of community, vitality, and diversity. Here on land, this hue likewise reflects our communitarian spirit: through digital technology and social media, our world is more closely networked—but at the same time, this online closeness makes us crave authentic offline interactions and meaningful connections all the more. This color acutely signifies that need for communication and engagement.

“With consumers, craving human interaction and social connection, the humanizing and heartening qualities displayed by the convivial PANTONE Living Coral hit a responsive chord,” explains Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the Pantone Color Institute.

While PANTONE 16-1546 can add a refreshing, carefree whimsy to any home, it’s certainly a staple of the Mediterranean, where brilliantly-colored mansions are reminiscent of barrier islands rising from the reefs. Here are some places and spaces with hues inspired by Living Coral.

A Hilltop Villa in Côte d’Azur

pantone color of the year

Peter IllovskyCôte d’Azur Sotheby’s International Realty

This vibrant hilltop villa was built-in the Côte d’Azur region of southern France in 1950s, at the behest of a wealthy Italian countess. Though it has been recently renovated, its views of the sparkling sea and the twinkling city lights remain as timeless as its traditional Florentine architecture. Old-fashioned touches, like the library, parlor, and orangery, are juxtaposed with contemporary luxuries such as the state-of-the-art kitchen and sleek infinity pool.

Modern Refinement in Algarve

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Vilamoura Office & Virgolino GomesPortugal Sotheby’s International Realty

There’s no shortage of modern élan in this magnificent, spacious villa. Situated in the picturesque Algarve region of Portugal, the property is only minutes away from the marina and beaches, and its gorgeous landscaped gardens feature a saltwater infinity pool, fruit trees, and views onto a pristine golf course. That makes it a perfect paradise for sun worshippers—though the interiors are just as spectacular, with huge airy rooms, marble floors, and a movie theater and fitness center in the basement.

Romantic Villa in Lucca

italian luxury home

Eleonora BenettiItaly Sotheby’s International Realty

Pantone says that Living Coral “embraces us with warmth and nourishment to provide comfort and buoyancy in our continually shifting environment”. This exceptional property in the historic Italian city of Lucca achieves a similar effect, creating a sanctuary of classic opulence and charm in a world that’s constantly changing. The exposed wooden beams and rustic tiling add to the authenticity of this one-of-a-kind villa, as does the enchanting sculpture garden with its backdrop of vineyards and olive groves.

Tasteful Opulence in Opatija

coral tropical home

Marko PažaninCroatia Sotheby’s International Realty

Located in the famous spa town of Opatija—a favorite among the Austro-Hungarian Empire’s elites—this villa’s coral-colored exterior complements the aquamarine sheen of the Adriatic Sea, which is visible from the main terrace. You may not know by looking at it, but the majestic three-story home is close to 100 years old, bringing together an immersive blend of tradition and innovation.

This seems only natural: after all, PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral is a color of nuance and contrast. It’s described as a “coral hue with a golden undertone that energizes and enlivens with a softer edge”—so as it invigorates, it also soothes. As it invites active experiences, it also encourages contemplation.

This is much more than just a pretty pink: Living Coral is a reflection of the moment in which we live and a reminder that we must live in harmony with our surroundings, our environment, and each other.

New & Notable Luxury Properties For Sale | December 2018

island homes

From a palatial estate in Chevy Chase, Maryland to a remarkable Art Deco villa in the center of Rome, these are this month’s four featured notable properties for sale.

new property for sale

Chevy Chase, Maryland | Daniel Heider, TTR Sotheby’s International Realty 

The Corby Mansion, built in 1893 for Francis Newlands, is a landmark in America’s first planned suburb designed by Chevy Chase architect Leon E. Dessez. A Congressman and Senator from Nevada, Newlands named the estate “Ishpiming,” meaning “high ground” in Chippewa. Senator Newlands was the organizer and first president of the Chevy Chase Club as well as a developer with the Chevy Chase Land Company. This highly coveted landmark estate prompted official inquiries regarding the possibility of it serving as the Vice President’s residence. The estate was instead sold to “Mother’s Bread” heir William S. Corby in 1909.

homes in moscow

Moscow, Russa | Natalia Filipovskaia, Moscow Sotheby’s International Realty 

This 2,164-square-meter mansion is located on nearly 6,000 square meters of land. Among the offered amenities, this home features a combined hall-library, home cinema, and swimming pool. An additional building on the site showcases a garage for four cars.

new york homes for sale

Bridgehampton, New York | Beate V. Moore, Sotheby’s International Realty – Bridgehampton Brokerage

This unparalleled oceanfront home was constructed in 2016 by master builder Ed Bulgin. Four luxurious ensuite bedrooms plus separate studio with bath give to breathtaking ocean views. The spectacular outdoor entertaining space surrounded by an oversized waterside gunite pool with spa, two grills, gas pizza oven, and fridge all overlooks the Atlantic. A three-car garage plus an additional one-car garage, two outdoor showers, and basketball hoop sit on nearly two beautifully landscaped gated acres.

Italian homes for sale

Rome, Italy | Vincenzo Lupattelli, Italy Sotheby’s International Realty 

This beautiful Art Deco villa is located in one of the most elegant districts in Rome, known as Ludovisi. Very close to the famous Villa Borghese park, Via Veneto, this residence is centrally located as it is only a few minutes from the Spanish Steps, Termini station, subway, and the shopping area. The villa has four floors and was built by the famous Roman architect, Carlo Pincherle.


Discover more properties for sale, in West Michigan or around the globe, by contacting one of our agents today.